Upcoming Webinars

 

ACTIONABLE CLIMATE SCIENCE 

SKILLS-BUILDING WEBINAR SERIES

 

This webinar series is designed to help those engaged in climate science research better understand the range of approaches for developing actionable science. Each webinar will explore ways to support effective collaborations between scientific researchers and natural resource managers. 

 

 

THE ROLE OF COMMUNICATION IN KNOWLEDGE CO-PRODUCTION 

- with Heidi Roop & Darcy Widmayer -

11:00 AM (PT) | Tuesday, June 5th

 

REGISTER HERE

 

Researchers and practitioners involved in knowledge co-production each use their own specialized language. An important part of successful knowledge co-production involves establishing shared terms of references. Communicating effectively and developing the ability to distill complex topics into clear, vivid, and understandable language is challenging. This webinar will explore the role of communication in the process of knowledge co-production and will share some communication best practices that participants can apply in their work.

 

PRESENTERS:

Heidi Roop | Research Scientist & Strategic Communications Lead, Climate Impacts Group at University of Washington

Dr. Heidi Roop is an expert in science communication, stakeholder engagement, and assessment and evaluation. Heidi's professional mission is to improve the reach and impact of climate science in order to engage, motivate and catalyze action around climate change. Heidi aspires to be a scientist who changes how the world engages in science, with scientists.

 

Darcy Widmayer | Communications Manager, NW Climate Adaptation Science Center at University of Washington

Darcy Widmayer has experience in strategic communications planning, message development, project coordination, and program evaluation. She previously worked for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR) as a Private Forestry Outreach Specialist facilitating communications between private landowners and state foresters.

 

 

 

BEST PRACTICES FOR COLLABORATIVE CLIMATE ADAPTATION RESEARCH BETWEEN TRIBAL AND NON-TRIBAL PARTNERS

- with Chas Jones & Amelia Marchand -

11:00 AM (PT) | Tuesday, July 10th

 

REGISTER HERE

 

This webinar will provide an introduction to key considerations and best practices associated with conducting climate adaptation research in partnership with tribal communities. Topics will include tribal sovereignty and government-to-government relations, the importance of community involvement and capacity-building, and the use and protection of indigenous knowledges.

 

PRESENTERS:

Chas Jones |Tribal Liaison, with the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians & NW Climate Science Center at United States Geological Survey

Dr. Jones is an interdisciplinary expert in the dynamic interactions between climate, water, ecology, and society.  He serves a key role in the delivery of climate change-related services to the tribal community in the Northwest, consistent with the objectives of the NW CSC Tribal Engagement Strategy.

 

Amelia Marchand | Water Regulatory Specialist, Environmental Trust Department at Confederated Tribes of Colville Reservation

An enrolled citizen of the Colville Tribes, Amelia’s heritage is Okanogan, Moses-Columbia, Arrow Lakes, Palus and Chief Joseph Band of Nez Perce. Her work includes environmental regulation of land use and development permits, advising on climate change mitigation and adaptation initiatives, facilitating public involvement in review processes, and education outreach on climate, food, and environmental justice.

 

 

 

AN INTRODUCTION TO COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH METHODS

- with Alison Meadow -

11:00 AM (PT) | Tuesday, May 1st

 

REGISTER HERE


Collaborative research is a unique approach to research in which the end-users of the findings (stakeholders) are actively involved in the process of research. Through collaboration, our stakeholders feel greater ownership over the research and are more likely to use it to take action. Collaborative research requires a particular set of research approaches and methods that allow it to be both scientific rigorous and highly relevant to real-world actors. This webinar will introduce the principles of collaborative research and demonstrate several activities researchers can use to make their work more collaborative and impactful.

 

PRESENTER:

Alison Meadow | Research Scientist, Institute of the Environment at University of Arizona

Dr. Meadow has a background in Environmental Anthropology.  Her research focuses on the process of linking scientists with decision makers to improve the usability of climate science. She also works on several interdisciplinary teams focused on helping natural resource, cultural resource, and emergency managers.

 

 

An Introduction to Collaborative Research Methods from Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center on Vimeo.

 

 

DEVELOPING A SUCCESSFUL CO-PRODUCTION COLLABORATION BETWEEN SCIENTISTS AND PRACTITIONERS

- with Meade Krosby & Amy Snover - 

11:00 AM (PT) | Tuesday, April 3rd

 

REGISTER HERE

 

Assessing and addressing climate risks will require rigorous science that is both useful to and used by decision-makers. Research has shown that such “actionable science” is most likely to be generated through “co-production” – the process of scientists working closely with decision-makers to identify key questions, design research approaches, conduct research, and communicate findings in such a way as to develop information, tools, and knowledge that solve real-world problems. This webinar is intended to help scientists and natural resource management professionals better understand the processes, skills, and outcomes associated with effective co-production of actionable climate science.

 

PRESENTERS:

Meade Krosby | Deputy University Director, NW Climate Adaptation Science Center & Senior Research Scientist, Climate Impacts Group at University of Washington

Dr. Krosby’s professional mission is to promote effective biodiversity conservation under climate change by collaboratively conducting innovative, rigorous, and useful assessments of climate impacts and adaptation responses for species and ecosystems.

 

Amy Snover | University Director, NW Climate Adaptation Science Center & Director, Climate Impacts Group at University of Washington

Dr. Snover works to connect science and decision-making to tackle today's pressing environmental challenges. Specifically, she aims to support the development of regional resilience to climate variability and change by harnessing science to address the real needs of resource managers, planners, and policymakers.

 

 

Developing a Successful Co-production Collaboration between Scientists and Practitioners from Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center on Vimeo.

Please direct any questions to Ronda Strauch (rstrauch@uw.edu)